Posted on Leave a comment

A Guide To Skin Contact Wine

We’re only too well aware of the vast list of traditional red and white wines available to us, but what about skin contact wine, or ‘Orange wine’? No, it’s not a Mimosa, and it’s definitely not an Aperol Spritz ! In fact, the only thing it really has in common with these much-loved beverages, is its colour. Skin contact wine is taking the grape world by storm thanks to its robust boldness along with strong hints of sunny day aromas – from the sweetness of honey to the earthy hit of hazelnut, and of course, freshly dried orange rind. Whether it’s your go-to, or you’re just absolutely itching to try it, we’ve put together everything you need to know about this intensely delicious drop of loveliness.

What Is Skin Contact Wine (Or Orange Wine)?

Believe it or not, skin contact wine has nothing to do with holding it close in a warm embrace while it works its magic. Instead, it’s another term for maceration, which is essentially where the skin of the grape remains on the fruit and intact with the juice during the entire winemaking process. While some reds and rosés retain the skin on their grapes at some point in the fermentation journey, they are often separated from the juice with time to achieve a certain flavour and hue. Skin contact wine is only ever made from white grapes (or green-skinned grapes), and as the juice in the grapes ferments on the skin, it emits extra tannin and flavour – much like what happens when a light or full-bodied red wine is made. 

During this process, the contents of the bottle can darken more than traditional white wine, but it isn’t always necessarily going to turn the wine that characteristic full-blown orange colour. The colour of skin contact wine can range from anywhere between an amber colour to a clear orange, it really just depends on the amount of time the grapes are left to ferment.

The History Of Skin Contact Wine

While skin contact wines may seem like a trend that’s only just started to gain traction with wine enthusiasts, it actually has some incredibly deep roots tied to the country it was first founded in – a place now known as the Republic of Georgia. The process of making skin contact wine here is said to have dated back to as far as 6000 B.C., when indigenous grapes, like Rkatsiteli and Tsolikouri, were fermented with skins on in clay vessels that were buried in the ground to maintain a cool temperature. To this day, making wine in these vessels called qvevri, which are lined and sealed with beeswax and stone lids, is still very much a big part of the winemaking culture in Georgia. 

What Does Skin Contact Wine Taste Like?

When describing the flavour and texture of skin contact wine, it can be likened to the difference between a red and a rosé. When grapes are vinified as traditional white wine, the taste can be particularly smooth, fruity and light. Because skin contact wine is fermented with the skins on, this results in it having a much bolder flavour with the oxidative characteristics we described earlier in the piece – nutty, honey-like with bruised apple tangs and a dry orange rind punchiness. 

In saying this, the range of tastes produced by skin contact wine are enormously vast, a result of the varying amounts of fermentation that the grapes go through. And if you haven’t tried a skin contact wine before, expect to get a touch of bitterness and ripeness thanks to those ageing skins releasing additional tannin. 

How To Pair Skin Contact Wines

Many would argue that skin contact wines are one of the best types of wine on the market when it comes to pairing them with food. This is because they offer the perfect balance between a traditional white wine and a traditional red, with their contrasting attributes – the fruity flavour of a white and the sharpness of a red. In the majority of cases, it’s best to go bold. Compatible with almost any cheese variety under the sun, you can’t go wrong with anything from a potent blue veined to a creamy French brie. 

One of the other benefits of skin contact wine as a companion for food, is its ability to harmonise with spicy foods such as rich curries and heat-inspired dishes, as well as hearty vegetarian dishes such as chickpea stew and lentil soups. But as we mentioned, they really are so versatile that you can pair them with anything you like – experiment to find your perfect pairing !

Is Skin Contact Wine Natural?

 

Because skin contact wine avoids the need for all those additives and other chemicals during the fermentation process, it has found itself among the ranks of the Natural Wine phenomenon – increasingly trendy and in high demand. While it is hard to pinpoint what exactly qualities render a wine “natural’’, the general idea is that natural wines are deemed as those created with very little intervention during the entire winemaking process. With more traditional techniques involved with skin contact wine, they’re generally going to be more cloudy and with sediment, much like an organic or biodynamic wine. 

While it might be a bit of a disappointment to discover that skin contact wine is, in fact, not made with oranges (!), it’s definitely just as mouth-wateringly good as a fresh bunch of them! As we’ve said earlier, it really is no wonder why this unique type of wine has become so popular – with the perfect marriage of characteristics, it’s eager to please and can pair with almost anything. And if you’re as passionate as us about good quality, good-tasting wine, you’ll not be able to wait to get your hands on a bottle of it. 

Disclaimer

The material and information contained on this website is for general information and entertainment purposes only. You should not rely upon the material or information on the website as a basis for making any business, legal, health or any other decisions. Whilst we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct,  THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such material is, therefore, strictly at your own risk. 
THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD will not be liable for any false, inaccurate, inappropriate or incomplete information presented on the website. Certain links in this website will lead to websites which are outside the control of THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD. When you activate these, you will leave the THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD website. THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD has no control over, and accepts no liability in respect of materials, products or services available on any website which is to the extent not prohibited by law, in no circumstances shall THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD be liable to you or any other third parties for any loss or damage (including, without limitation, damage for loss of business or loss of profits) arising directly or indirectly from your use of or inability to use, this site or any of the material contained in it. 

Posted on Leave a comment

A Guide To Natural Wine

As we grow more and more conscious of the way we consume, from food to movement, body products to waste, industries are quickly following suit to reflect those values that come with taking more care of our bodies at the same time as the planet. With the list of sustainable and stripped-down products growing, natural wine has inevitably joined the ranks – and the industry is flourishing. People are actively seeking out wines that are made with minimal intervention and additives, but for many the question still lies around what natural wine is actually all about. In this guide, we’ll explore everything from its process, to its characteristics, and what sets it apart from more conventionally produced wine as a whole. 

Search our natural wines below….

What Is Natural Wine?

Becoming a winemaker is not exactly something you’re just born to do. It takes a whole lot of training, education, practice and perfecting, to get the art of this unique profession (or hobby horse) just right. And while every bottle produced has something unique to offer its consumer, when it comes to natural wine, the process is a little different – we like to think of it as a “hands-off approach”. Now, this doesn’t mean that you can just sit back and let the grapes turn themselves into wine, but it does mean dropping a lot of the chemicals and additives out of it, as well as avoiding adding anything to it, to ensure the winemaking process is as ‘natural’ as it possibly can be. 

It’s important to acknowledge that there is no official definition of what constitutes a natural wine, but at its essence the wine is produced without the need for pesticides or other chemicals of any sort, and is fermented using natural yeast only. Acid, sugar and additives in general are also ruled out from the process to generate an unfiltered, unrefined end product. Rather like wine would have been thousands of years ago.

The way natural wine is grown in the vineyard is very different from what you might see when on a typical winery tour. Instead of wandering through perfectly manicured grapevines, natural wine production essentially means leaving the vineyards to fend for themselves. In this case, you’re more likely to see vines that are surrounded by biodiversity, where ‘cover’ crops line the soil itself, and animals go about their day around them – very likely looking for vine pests to munch on. The idea being for the process of growing natural vines in the vineyard to mirror the biodiversity of the land which surrounds it. If there is any need for intervention, the products used are of natural origin. 
We’ve talked about the fact that “natural wine” is a very loose term, and with that comes a few different techniques under the umbrella terminology that are slightly easier to put your finger on.

Organic Wine

Essentially, what makes organic wine ‘organic’ is the fact that it’s made from organic grapes. This means the grapes were grown using processes where there is emphasis on the use of renewable energy sources and the conservation of water and soil. The goal is to ensure that any step carried out is done so with the impact it will have on the environment right at front of mind. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the grapes haven’t been exposed to any additives, but it does mean that if they have, you can rely on the fact that they were organic. Depending on the country, or even the region the wine is from, winemakers may or may not add sulphites to their product.

Biodynamic Wine

The process of making biodynamic wine is where organic wine is taken to a whole new level. In a nutshell, biodynamic farming as a practise involves a spiritual, holistic and ethical approach to food production. Much like how organic wines are produced, there are little or no additives, but the difference is that the vineyard, and the process from start to finish, are considered as an entire ecosystem, that is very much inherently linked. Biodynamic production of wine even goes as far as linking factors like the lunar cycles to the growth patterns of the vines, the soil beneath them and everything in between.

The History Of Natural Wine

There’s no doubt about it, natural wine has taken off in the last few years – but it definitely wasn’t discovered yesterday. Let’s take it back to the 1950s, when chemical farming was booming and winemakers were eager to challenge those norms and look at alternative and cleaner ways of production. Jules Chauvet, a winemaker and chemist, joined forces with three like-minded young winemakers, Guy Breton, Jean-Paul Thévenet, and Jean Foillard, to form the Gang of Four. This group committed themselves to work with natural vines, abandoning synthetic herbicides and pesticides, harvesting late, and carefully hand-sorting grapes without adding sugar to ferment them once in the wine cellar. These are just some of the people we can thank for spearheading the natural wine movement. 

Natural Wine Versus Conventional Wine

While natural wine is all the rage, it is a far more complex process than conventional winemaking, which involves many risks, as well as additional time and money for the growers, and producers. But the biggest difference between the two is that conventional wine is made using various herbicides, pesticides, and synthetic fertilisers to ward off unwanted pests and preserve the grapes in a way that is more efficient and effective than alternative methods. 

The inclusion of wine in our diets and daily lives, has been a topic of debate for decades. Is it good for us ? How much should we consume ? Which type of wine is better for us ? These questions have been discussed around social circles since forever, and with the way our society functions, it’s no surprise. Arguably, natural wine is better for us because it doesn’t include all the perceived “nasties”, which means it’s more inclined to be better for us on the whole. 

Then there’s the sustainability factor. When wine is created without all of the things that destroy natural habitats, as well as flora and fauna, it’s bound to have a positive effect on the environment. Once the grapes make their way to the wine cellar, the lack of need for machinery to process the grapes is also a big energy saver – a way to reduce more carbon footprint.

In terms of what the best type of wine to drink is, it really comes down to personal preference. But what is undeniably true, is that we can expect to see more natural wines making their way to store shelves and their popularity among wine drinkers heading in an upward incline direction.  

What Does Natural Wine Taste Like?

Just like any food or beverage, every person has a different perspective on how it should taste, feel, smell and look. However, it may come as a bit of a shock to some when natural wine doesn’t reflect the tasting experience of conventional wine. Because the process is so simplified, it’s often found that natural wine has a more cloudy consistency and can even be slightly fizzy – this is a result of the wine not being filtered the same way, and because it’ s fermented for a longer period of time, the wine can turn out quite ‘bubbly’. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with these elements, but it can be a bit of an adjustment for those who are used to smoother styles of wine. 

Another characteristic of natural wine is that it can have a more potent aroma and a slightly punchier flavour profile similar to cider. While those who are not used to these qualities may see them as negatives, others would see them as an enhancement of flavour and texture. At the same time, there are many natural wines that have the same qualities as conventional wine, in the sense that they look and feel the same when tasted. There’s no harm in being adventurous with your natural wines, and it’s encouraged to try a few before you make a decision on whether its for you, or not. 

What Food Can You Pair With Natural Wine?

One of the most special aspects of wine is that it can provide an entirely unique culinary experience when paired with food. We know that red wine pairs well with red meat and white wine pairs well with fish, but what about when it comes to natural wine pairings with meals ? We believe there are no boundaries when pairing wine with food, if you want to pair a lighter red with salmon, why not? And this rings even more true for natural wine. You can eat any food with any type of wine, but we have a few recommendations we think you’ll fall in love with. 

The next time you go to purchase wine, why not go for a natural sparkling wine and have it alongside your favourite seafood or even something deliciously deep-fried ? There’s nothing quite like an icy cold Rosé with cheese – have it with platter essentials, or go the crispy route with a perfectly grilled cheese sandwich. Natural light reds are a match made in heaven with savoury foods, earthy flavours and the tangy hit of tomato-based dishes. And as usual, you can’t go wrong with rich red wine and some tantalising lamb chops.

Whatever you’re feeling, it’s key to remember that pairing like-with-like is almost always going to work – light with light, red with red. But at the same time, we have to stress the beauty of following your taste buds, so if it works for you, pair your natural wine with whatever you like. 

What Is The Alcohol Content Of Natural Wine?

It’s no secret, an increasing amount of people are turning to lower alcohol or 0% alternatives. Whether it’s for health reasons, or being able to join in on social occasions and still drive themselves home, more conscious consumption of alcohol has become part & parcel of today’s society. So the question of whether or not natural wine is lower in alcohol than conventional wine is often a talking point. The simple answer is Yes. 
Many conventional wines have sugar added to them during the fermentation process to speed production up and increase the alcohol level. With natural wine, the absence of sugars means that the level of alcohol is inevitably lower. The lack of additives has also been shown to decrease the chance of a hangover if you’re indulging in a few. It also comes down to quality, if you’re drinking cheaper, lower-grade wines; there are always going to be more things added to them – whether from pesticides to clarifying agents, the more that’s added, the worse you’re going to feel the next day.

With a rich history and loads of benefits, there’s no wonder natural wine is taking the industry by storm. From cutting out all of the unnecessary additives to introducing a more diverse era of flavour, there’s so much to celebrate when it comes to the production of natural, more sustainably produced wine. If you’re still on the fence, we suggest branching out and trying a wide range of natural wines until you find your go-to, because there’s no doubt about it – natural wine is well on its way to becoming a household staple.

Disclaimer

The material and information contained on this website is for general information and entertainment purposes only. You should not rely upon the material or information on the website as a basis for making any business, legal, health or any other decisions. Whilst we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct,  THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such material is, therefore, strictly at your own risk. 
THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD will not be liable for any false, inaccurate, inappropriate or incomplete information presented on the website. Certain links in this website will lead to websites which are outside the control of THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD. When you activate these, you will leave the THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD website. THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD has no control over and accepts no liability in respect of materials, products or services available on any website which is to the extent not prohibited by law, in no circumstances shall THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD be liable to you or any other third parties for any loss or damage (including, without limitation, damage for loss of business or loss of profits) arising directly or indirectly from your use of or inability to use, this site or any of the material contained in it. 

Posted on Leave a comment

Wine Lingo Debunked

It’s one thing not knowing how to pronounce the names of wines and feeling like a fool when ordering your chosen drop, but understanding wine lingo can be a whole different story. Whether you’re a keen wine drinker or just starting to delve into the world of deliciously fermented grapes, getting to know the language and the meanings behind it can make a big difference to your experience and help you on your journey to discovering what really tickles your fancy when it comes to the wonderful world of wine. Terms like tannins and terroir can instill quite a bit of fear when you’re reading them on the menu or hearing it from a wine expert, but becoming an expert is easier than ever with our guide on wine lingo debunked. So, without further ado, let’s get into it.

Wine Taste Terms

Taste, being one of our most heightened senses, is something we come across a lot when we talk about wine. When we describe what we can taste at a basic level when drinking wine, usually terms like fruity or bitter spring to mind. However, there are a whole host of jargony words used to describe the taste of wine that naturally go over many people’s heads. We’re here to explain them to you.

Oaked Wine

Much like it sounds, oaked wine is a term used to describe wine that has been aged in oak barrels. These barrels infuse flavours and aromas into the wine that give off notes of vanilla, butter, and sometimes coconut in white wines, while red wines commonly have hints of baking spices or vanilla. It also tends to enhance the colour of the wine, as well as soften and round out flavours.

Corked Wine

While it may sound fancy, it’s far from it. Corked wine, believe it or not, doesn’t mean it’s soaked in corks. In fact, it’s actually an incredibly unpleasant taste and an indicator that the wine process has been a failure and will often smell like something as awful as wet dog or soggy, mouldy cardboard. Trust us, you’ll know about it if you taste it.

Balanced Wine

Again, this is not the kind of wine you drink while walking across a tightrope, instead, it actually describes how the levels of acidity, sweetness, tannin, alcohol and body interact. The idea is that a wine is defined as balanced when all of these elements work in unison to create a beautiful flavour. At the same time, taste is really an objective thing so it can come down to each individual person’s perspective on what a balanced wine tastes like.

Herbaceous Wine

Think of an abundance of greenery and fresh herbs on the palette – that’s what a herbaceous wine tastes like. While herbaceous wines can be made from grapes grown in a wide range of climates, they’re generally grown in cooler climates where all that green goodness is flourishing.

Beefy Wine

An odd one to say the least, when people describe the flavour of wine as beefy, it actually means that it has big flavour with lots of texture and not a whole lot of that fruity essence. Big wine is also another way to say the same thing.

Minerality

This one is another common wine term that gets tossed around and refers to the unique smells and flavours of rocks or cement. The reason the grapes gain this flavour is due to being grown in conditions where the soil is rich in minerals and rocks which inevitably give the wine that flavour.

Winemaking Process Terms

There are so many different ways in which wines are processed in the cellar, and the terms to describe those processes can generally be just as confusing as those that describe their taste.

Vintage

This term essentially means the year the grapes were harvested. Vintage wines are, as you would expect, tend to be older wines, but they can cover a real variety of time periods.

Lees

A type of wine that is made by leaving the sediment from the fermentation process in the wine. Lees is the sediment made up of grape matter, yeast cells, seeds, stems, and pulp. By leaving the wine on its lees, it can develop a richer body and creaminess – often used in the production of white wines.

Fining

Fining is a process used to filter the wine by catching any solids and removing all of the particles that could potentially make the wine cloudy, and is done by adding egg white, gelatine or clay.

Maceration

Here is where all the juice and skins from the grapes are fermented together to create extra colour, tannins and aromas – a process commonly used to create skin contact or orange wine.

Geography Of Wine Terms

As the title suggests, this is where terms are used to describe where and in what climate the grapes are grown for winemaking.

Terroir

Pronounced “tear-woah”, this term is derived from the French language and describes how the combination of the climate, soil, winemaking process and a bunch of other factors contribute to the outcome of the wine and how it tastes.

Provenance

Pretty self-explanatory, the provenance of a wine characterises the source, storage and life cycle of a wine and tells the story of where it comes from and how it’s been stored and cared for. Depending on the provenance of a wine, the cost can get particularly pricey and is a big drawcard for high flyers. It’s fair to say after going through this list of wine terms debunked, you can consider yourself to be quite the expert and will never have to worry about choosing the wrong wine as a result of not understanding its qualities. So whether you want to show off your knowledge or delve a little deeper into the world of wine, you’re now prepared as ever! Disclaimer The material and information contained on this website is for general information and entertainment purposes only. You should not rely upon the material or information on the website as a basis for making any business, legal, health or any other decisions. Whilst we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct,  THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such material is, therefore, strictly at your own risk. THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD will not be liable for any false, inaccurate, inappropriate or incomplete information presented on the website. Certain links in this website will lead to websites which are outside the control of THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD. When you activate these, you will leave the THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD website. THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD has no control over and accepts no liability in respect of materials, products or services available on any website which is to the extent not prohibited by law, in no circumstances shall THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD be liable to you or any other third parties for any loss or damage (including, without limitation, damage for loss of business or loss of profits) arising directly or indirectly from your use of or inability to use, this site or any of the material contained in it.
Posted on Leave a comment

REGION OF THE MONTH – AOSTA VALLEY

It may be Italy’s smallest region, but don’t let its size fool you – this picturesque hot spot is bursting at the seams with sights to explore and experiences to dive right into. And just like any of Italy’s nooks and crannies, Aosta Valley, or Valle d’Aosta, is home to some of the world’s most succulent wines that any connoisseur would happily travel the globe to find. Located in the heart of the Alps, it may not seem like an ideal place for grape growing, but its continental climate provides just the right conditions. With warm, sunny days that are perfect for cultivating grapes, vineyards are planted on terraced slopes that overlook the valley and face the sun. The result of this unique combination of climate and terrain? Some of the most delicious and distinctive wines in all of Italy.

Discover Aosta Valley

By far the tiniest producer of wine in Italy, the region of Aosta Valley sits right on the border of France and Switzerland and is surrounded by the four highest mountain peaks in the “Rome of the Alps” – Mont Blanc, Matterhorn, Monte Rosa and the Gran Paradiso. With terrain entirely covered in centuries-old and indigenous varieties of grapes, it flies particularly quietly under the radar for a place that has so much to offer in terms of culture, scenery, and of course, wine and food. And despite its handy geographical location, wine lovers are only just beginning to scratch the surface of what thirst-quenching delicacies it holds within its confines.

While there is little space for agriculture, Aosta Valley is somewhat of a bustling metropolis during the winter season with plenty to do in the outdoors. From skiing Courmayeur, Pila, Chamois and Breuil-Cervinia, to hiking Tour Du Mont Blanc and experiencing the true beauty of its glass blue lakes, towering waterfalls and breathtaking views, there’s something for everyone. In the slightly warmer months between May and October, visitors have the opportunity to see these sights in a whole new light, and they’re just as jaw-dropping.

Then there’s the thriving wine culture. When it comes to the production of wine, there are about 13 different varieties produced by about 400 local growers, but very few people will have had the luxury of being able to taste-test them. Only 1.2 million bottles are produced a year, and unlike lots of Italian wines, they are not distributed far and wide, and instead, are mainly consumed locally.

Origins And The French Connection

If you’ve travelled to Aosta Valley, you will have noticed that many of the street names are not in Italian, but in fact in French. Conversations between locals can tend to sound very similar in that sense, so if you’ve been left feeling a little confused, it’s only natural. While it does border France, it’s not part of it. But at the same time, because of France and Italy’s proximity to each other, as well as their history, a strong tie exists between the two. This is the case so much so that Aosta Valley locals are very much bilingual!

On the topic of history, Aosta Valley’s is incredibly rich. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Aosta became part of the Kingdom of Burgundy and was then ruled by the royal family of Italy, the House of Savoy, until the Italian unification in 1861. While it is uncertain whether Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Gamay were first introduced during the period of Burgundian control, many varieties are now grown and produced in Valle d’Aosta. However, there was a big push for farmers to grow Burgundian grapes after World War II, but it was later decided that native varieties of grapes were what gave Aosta Valley its edge and made it the region it was.

Exploring Valle D’Aosta Wines

Just like all produce, different varieties thrive in different climates, and that includes grapes. In Valle d’Aosta, centuries of experience and knowledge have been passed down through generations to determine the best way in which to plant and harvest grapes. As a result, each variety of wine is grown at varying heights along vines planted on pergolas and scattered along terrace slopes above the valley. It starts at the top where the drier white wines are grown from the heights of Morgex et La Salle, from 3000-4300 feet above sea level, followed by the Petit Rouge-based red wines from the central zone, Chambave to Enfer d’Arvier, at around 1600-2300 feet above sea level, and then lastly, the Nebbiolo-based red wines from Arnad-Montjovet and Donnas, which are grown at about 1000-1300 feet above sea level.

The viticultural area of Aosta Valley begins at the Donnas, which is near the border of Piedmont, and extends all the way across to Morgex which is located about an hour’s drive away from the French town of Chamonix. The region’s winemakers take great pride in their craft and are world-renowned for their exceptionally made, authentic wines. Among the most popular with locals and tourists alike are the high-altitude Nebbiolo wines, known locally as Picotendro or Picotene and produced by the cooperative Caves de Donnas. Other noteworthy wines include Nus Malvoisie (Pinot Grigio) from the commune of Nus, Petit Rouge-dominant wines from Chambave and Torrette, Fumin, Cornalin, as well as the crisp white wines of Petite Arvine and bright and the mineral Prié Blanc from Morgex and La Salle.

Valle D’Aosta Wineries

Now that we’ve covered all there is to know about the history of Aosta Valley, the types of wines that are grown in this corner of the world, and got a picture of what makes a hidden gem like this so special, the next step, naturally, is to explore all of the amazing wineries that you can visit while you’re there. We’ve put together a list of the best of the best so you can take your time traversing this land that produces some of the top wines in the world.

Andrea Barbieri

Cave Mont Blanc

Grosjean Vini

Noussan Vini


Disclaimer

The material and information contained on this website is for general information and entertainment purposes only. You should not rely upon the material or information on the website as a basis for making any business, legal, health or any other decisions. Whilst we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct,  THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such material is, therefore, strictly at your own risk. 
THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD will not be liable for any false, inaccurate, inappropriate or incomplete information presented on the website. Certain links in this website will lead to websites which are outside the control of THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD. When you activate these, you will leave the THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD website. THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD has no control over and accepts no liability in respect of materials, products or services available on any website which is to the extent not prohibited by law, in no circumstances shall THE ITALIAN WINE SHOP LTD be liable to you or any other third parties for any loss or damage (including, without limitation, damage for loss of business or loss of profits) arising directly or indirectly from your use of or inability to use, this site or any of the material contained in it.